When you enter a house, say "SUP, YO?" And if they say "SUP" in return then… Luke 10

sup copyThere are many who call on and try to emulate the method of what is commonly called the “person of peace” in Luke 10  I’ve often wondered if speaking peace over a house, into a house, or at a person was some mysterious key to initiating a secret evangelism process.  In fact, let’s take a look at the whole passage:

Jesus said, “Go! I am sending you out like lambs among wolves. Do not take a purse or bag or sandals; and do not greet anyone on the road.  When you enter a house, first say, ‘Peace to this house.’ If a man of peace is there, your peace will rest on him; if not, it will return to you. Stay in that house, eating and drinking whatever they give you, for the worker deserves his wages. Do not move around from house to house.  When you enter a town and are welcomed, eat what is set before you.  Heal the sick who are there and tell them, ‘The kingdom of God is near you.’”  Luke 10:3-8

Was there something magical in the phrase “peace to this house?”

Is it appropriate to use this phrase today?  Why or Why Not?

What words, if any, would you use instead? 

 

 

0 thoughts on “When you enter a house, say "SUP, YO?" And if they say "SUP" in return then… Luke 10

  1. Ross Rohde says:

    Here’s my personal answer to your questions. I give these as someone who actively does this kind of ministry, but not as someone who has all the answers.

    Was there something magical in the phrase “peace to this house?” No, it’s not magical. But it does, I believe, reflect some very profound missiological principles, if you want to call them that.

    Is it appropriate to use this phrase today? Why or Why Not? Since the phrase itself isn’t magical the power isn’t in the phrase. I suspect this had a lot to do with a culturally appropriate greeting and how people responded to it. Put it this way. As a person who represents Jesus, I say to your household (the real meaning of the word “house” in this context) I come in peace (say it any way you want including “Sup?”) If they respond with interest and willingness to have you interact with their household stay there. If not be gracious and move on.

    What words, if any, would you use instead? It has probably been different every time when Jesus led me to a household through a person of peace. In fact, I can’t specifically remember what words I used in any given incident.

  2. Dan B. says:

    I take it as more an attitude that’s expressed to the person and persons living in that house than specific words. That you want the best for them and you’re thankful for them. It was said that St. Patric, instead of bringing judgment on the people of Ireland and obsessing over their sinfulness, he communicated to them their potential waiting for them in Christ. I think it might be something like that, bringing shalom to a household.

  3. Marshall says:

    concurring with Dan here…
    be speaking peace to the household [λεγετε ειρηωη τω οικω]. So, we go in bringing the words (and spirit) of peace with hope that our/His peace will find a resting place in that household.

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